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Sir Alec Guinness, CH, CBE (born Alec Guinness de Cuffe; 2 April 1914 – 5 August 2000) was an English agent. After an early arrangement on the stage, Guinness was featured in separate of the Ealing Comedies, including The Ladykillers and Kind Hearts and Coronets in which he played nine different characters. He is also known for his six collaborations with David Lean: Herbert Pocket in Great Expectations (1946), Fagin in Oliver Twist (1948), Col. Nicholson in The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957, for which he won the Academy Award for Best Actor), Prince Faisal in Lawrence of Arabia (1962), General Yevgraf Zhivago in Doctor Zhivago (1965), and Professor Godbole in A Passage to India (1984). He is also known for his portrayal of Obi-Wan Kenobi in George Lucas's first Star Wars trilogy, receiving a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor. Guinness was one of three British actors, along with Laurence Olivier and John Gielgud, who made the transition from Shakespearean theatre to blockbuster films immediately behind World War II. Guinness served in the Royal Naval Reserve during the war and commanded a landing art during the incursion of Sicily and Elba. During the war he was granted freedom to appear in the stage play Flare Path almost RAF Bomber Command. Guinness won an Academy Award, a BAFTA, a Golden Globe and a Tony Award. In 1959, he was knighted by Elizabeth II for services to the arts. He accepted a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 1960, the Academy Honorary Award for lifetime exploit in 1980 and the BAFTA Academy Fellowship Award in 1989. Guinness appeared in nine films that featured in the BFI's 100 greatest British films of the 20th century, which included five of Lean's films. Guinness was born at 155 Lauderdale Mansions South, Lauderdale Road, Maida Vale, as Alec Guinness de Cuffe. His mother's maiden designation was Agnes Cuff. She was born 8 December 1890 to Edward Cuff and Mary Ann Benfield. On Guinness's descent certificate, the extension for the mother's designation shows Agnes de Cuffe. The extension for the infant's designation (where leading names one are given) says Alec Guinness. The column for designation and surname of father is blank. The join of Guinness's father has never been officially confirmed. From 1875, below English regulation, when the descent of an illegitimate child was registered, the father's designation could be entered on the certificate one if he were existing and gave his furnish. Guinness himself believed that his father was a Scottish banker, Andrew Geddes (1861–1928), who paid for Guinness's open school education at Fettes College. Geddes sometimes visited Guinness and his mother, posing as an uncle. Guinness's mother later had a three-year espousals to a Scottish troops captain named Stiven; his behaviour was frequently desultory or plane vehement. Guinness leading worked writing advertising imitation. His leading job in the theatre was on his 20th birthday, while he was quiet a drama student, in the play Libel, which opened at the aged King's Theatre, Hammersmith, and then transferred to the Playhouse, where his status was raised from a step-on to understudying two lines, and his salary increased to £1 a week. He appeared at the Albery Theatre in 1936 at the period of 22, playing the role of Osric in John Gielgud's lucky origination of Hamlet. Also in 1936, Guinness signed on with the Old Vic, where he was hurl in a order of classic roles. In 1939, he took over for Michael Redgrave as Charleston in a highway-exhibit origination of Robert Ardrey's Thunder Rock. During his period at the Old Vic, he worked with numerous actors and actresses who would befit his friends and numerous co-stars in the forthcoming, including Gielgud, Ralph Richardson, Peggy Ashcroft, Anthony Quayle, and Jack Hawkins. An early effect from abroad was Stan Laurel, whom Guinness admired. Guinness continued playing Shakespearean roles throughout his arrangement. In 1937, he played Aumerle in Richard II and Lorenzo in The Merchant of Venice below the course of John Gielgud. He starred in a 1938 origination of Hamlet which won him acclaim on twain sides of the Atlantic. He also appeared as Romeo in a origination of Romeo and Juliet (1939), Andrew Aguecheek in Twelfth Night, and as Exeter in Henry V in 1937, twain facing Laurence Olivier, and Ferdinand in The Tempest, facing Gielgud as Prospero. In 1939, he adapted Charles Dickens' novel Great Expectations for the stage, playing Herbert Pocket. The play was a achievement. One of its viewers was a young British film editor, David Lean, who would later occupy Guinness reprise his role in Lean's 1946 film accommodation of the play. Guinness served in the Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve in the Second World War, initially as a seaman in 1941, precedently receiving a commission as a Temporary Sub-lieutenant on 30 April 1942 and a furtherance to Temporary Lieutenant the following year. Guinness then commanded a landing art at the Allied incursion of Sicily, and later ferried supplies and agents to the Yugoslav partisans in the eastern Mediterranean theatre. During the war, he was granted freedom to appear in the Broadway origination of Terence Rattigan's play, Flare Path, almost RAF Bomber Command, with Guinness playing the role of Flight Lieutenant Teddy Graham. Guinness returned to the Old Vic in 1946 and stayed until 1948, playing Abel Drugger in Ben Jonson's The Alchemist, the Fool in King Lear facing Laurence Olivier in the inscription role, DeGuiche in Cyrano de Bergerac facing Ralph Richardson in the inscription role, and finally starring in an Old Vic origination as Shakespeare's Richard II. After leaving the Old Vic, he played Eric Birling in J. B. Priestley's An Inspector Calls at the New Theatre in October 1946. He played the Uninvited Guest in the Broadway origination of T. S. Eliot's The Cocktail Party (1950, revived at the Edinburgh Festival in 1968). He played Hamlet below his occupy course at the New Theatre in the West End in 1951. Invited by his associate Tyrone Guthrie to join the premiere period of the Stratford Festival of Canada, Guinness lived for a brief period in Stratford, Ontario. On 13 July 1953, Guinness spoke the leading lines of the leading play produced by the festival, Shakespeare's Richard III: "Now is the winter of our discontent/Made glorious summer by this sun of York."

Sir Alec Guinness, CH, CBE (born Alec Guinness de Cuffe; 2 April 1914 – 5 August 2000) was an English agent. After an early arrangement on the stage, Guinness was featured in separate of the Ealing Comedies, including The Ladykillers and Kind Hearts and Coronets in which he played nine different characters. He is also known for his six collaborations with David Lean: Herbert Pocket in Great Expectations (1946), Fagin in Oliver Twist (1948), Col. Nicholson in The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957, for which he won the Academy Award for Best Actor), Prince Faisal in Lawrence of Arabia (1962), General Yevgraf Zhivago in Doctor Zhivago (1965), and Professor Godbole in A Passage to India (1984). He is also known for his portrayal of Obi-Wan Kenobi in George Lucas's first Star Wars trilogy, receiving a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor. Guinness was one of three British actors, along with Laurence Olivier and John Gielgud, who made the transition from Shakespearean theatre to blockbuster films immediately behind World War II. Guinness served in the Royal Naval Reserve during the war and commanded a landing art during the incursion of Sicily and Elba. During the war he was granted freedom to appear in the stage play Flare Path almost RAF Bomber Command. Guinness won an Academy Award, a BAFTA, a Golden Globe and a Tony Award. In 1959, he was knighted by Elizabeth II for services to the arts. He accepted a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 1960, the Academy Honorary Award for lifetime exploit in 1980 and the BAFTA Academy Fellowship Award in 1989. Guinness appeared in nine films that featured in the BFI's 100 greatest British films of the 20th century, which included five of Lean's films. Guinness was born at 155 Lauderdale Mansions South, Lauderdale Road, Maida Vale, as Alec Guinness de Cuffe. His mother's maiden designation was Agnes Cuff. She was born 8 December 1890 to Edward Cuff and Mary Ann Benfield. On Guinness's descent certificate, the extension for the mother's designation shows Agnes de Cuffe. The extension for the infant's designation (where leading names one are given) says Alec Guinness. The column for designation and surname of father is blank. The join of Guinness's father has never been officially confirmed. From 1875, below English regulation, when the descent of an illegitimate child was registered, the father's designation could be entered on the certificate one if he were existing and gave his furnish. Guinness himself believed that his father was a Scottish banker, Andrew Geddes (1861–1928), who paid for Guinness's open school education at Fettes College. Geddes sometimes visited Guinness and his mother, posing as an uncle. Guinness's mother later had a three-year espousals to a Scottish troops captain named Stiven; his behaviour was frequently desultory or plane vehement. Guinness leading worked writing advertising imitation. His leading job in the theatre was on his 20th birthday, while he was quiet a drama student, in the play Libel, which opened at the aged King's Theatre, Hammersmith, and then transferred to the Playhouse, where his status was raised from a step-on to understudying two lines, and his salary increased to £1 a week. He appeared at the Albery Theatre in 1936 at the period of 22, playing the role of Osric in John Gielgud's lucky origination of Hamlet. Also in 1936, Guinness signed on with the Old Vic, where he was hurl in a order of classic roles. In 1939, he took over for Michael Redgrave as Charleston in a highway-exhibit origination of Robert Ardrey's Thunder Rock. During his period at the Old Vic, he worked with numerous actors and actresses who would befit his friends and numerous co-stars in the forthcoming, including Gielgud, Ralph Richardson, Peggy Ashcroft, Anthony Quayle, and Jack Hawkins. An early effect from abroad was Stan Laurel, whom Guinness admired. Guinness continued playing Shakespearean roles throughout his arrangement. In 1937, he played Aumerle in Richard II and Lorenzo in The Merchant of Venice below the course of John Gielgud. He starred in a 1938 origination of Hamlet which won him acclaim on twain sides of the Atlantic. He also appeared as Romeo in a origination of Romeo and Juliet (1939), Andrew Aguecheek in Twelfth Night, and as Exeter in Henry V in 1937, twain facing Laurence Olivier, and Ferdinand in The Tempest, facing Gielgud as Prospero. In 1939, he adapted Charles Dickens' novel Great Expectations for the stage, playing Herbert Pocket. The play was a achievement. One of its viewers was a young British film editor, David Lean, who would later occupy Guinness reprise his role in Lean's 1946 film accommodation of the play. Guinness served in the Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve in the Second World War, initially as a seaman in 1941, precedently receiving a commission as a Temporary Sub-lieutenant on 30 April 1942 and a furtherance to Temporary Lieutenant the following year. Guinness then commanded a landing art at the Allied incursion of Sicily, and later ferried supplies and agents to the Yugoslav partisans in the eastern Mediterranean theatre. During the war, he was granted freedom to appear in the Broadway origination of Terence Rattigan's play, Flare Path, almost RAF Bomber Command, with Guinness playing the role of Flight Lieutenant Teddy Graham. Guinness returned to the Old Vic in 1946 and stayed until 1948, playing Abel Drugger in Ben Jonson's The Alchemist, the Fool in King Lear facing Laurence Olivier in the inscription role, DeGuiche in Cyrano de Bergerac facing Ralph Richardson in the inscription role, and finally starring in an Old Vic origination as Shakespeare's Richard II. After leaving the Old Vic, he played Eric Birling in J. B. Priestley's An Inspector Calls at the New Theatre in October 1946. He played the Uninvited Guest in the Broadway origination of T. S. Eliot's The Cocktail Party (1950, revived at the Edinburgh Festival in 1968). He played Hamlet below his occupy course at the New Theatre in the West End in 1951. Invited by his associate Tyrone Guthrie to join the premiere period of the Stratford Festival of Canada, Guinness lived for a brief period in Stratford, Ontario. On 13 July 1953, Guinness spoke the leading lines of the leading play produced by the festival, Shakespeare's Richard III: "Now is the winter of our discontent/Made glorious summer by this sun of York."

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