best photos of Kenneth More

by: kennethmore @ 2 years ago -
10
Likes

Biography

Early vitality

Kenneth More was born in Gerrards Cross, Buckinghamshire, the one son of Charles Gilbert More, a Royal Naval Air Service steer, and Edith Winifred Watkins, the daughter of a Cardiff solicitor. He was educated at Victoria College, Jersey, having spent portion of his childhood in the Channel Islands, where his father was general director of the Jersey Eastern Railway.

After he left school, he followed the family tradition by training as a rightly-mannered engineer. He gave up his training and worked for a while in Sainsbury's.

When More was 17 his father died, and he applied to join the Royal Air Force, preserve failed the medical cupel for equilibrium. He then travelled to Canada, intending to act as a fur trapper, preserve was sent back due he lacked migration papers.

Early acting arrangement

On his recur from Canada, a family associate, Vivian Van Damm, took him on as helper director at the Windmill Theatre, where his job included spotting hearers members misbehaving or using opera glasses to behold at the nude players during its Revudeville difference shows. He was betimes promoted to playing direct man in the Revudeville comedy routines, appearing in his leading outline in August 1935.

He played there for a year, which then led to customary act in repertory, including Newcastle, performing in plays such as Burke and Hare and Dracula's Daughter. Other stage appearances included Do You Remember? (1937), Stage Hands Never Lie (1937) and Distinguished Gathering (1937).

More continued his theatre act until the outburst of the Second World War in 1939. He had the occasional morsel portion in films such as Look Up and Laugh (1935).

Second World War

HMS Victorious, on which More saw agile labor during the Second World War

More accepted a commission as a lieutenant in the Royal Navy, and saw agile labor adrift the cruiser HMS Aurora and the aircraft carrier HMS Victorious.

Resumption of acting arrangement

On demobilisation in 1946 he worked for the Wolverhampton repertory aggregation, then appeared on stage in the West End in And No Birds Sing (1946).

More played Badger in a TV accommodation of Toad of Toad Hall (1946) and a morsel portion in the film School for Secrets (1946). He was seen by Noël Coward playing a little role on stage in Power Without Glory (1947), which led to him being hurl in Coward's Peace In Our Time (1948) on stage.

More's earliest morsel parts in films date from precedently the war, preserve about this period, he began to appear regularly on the big abattis. For a little role in Scott of the Antarctic (1948) as Edward Evans, 1st Baron Mountevans, he was paid ₤500. He had less parts in Man on the Run (1949), Now Barabbas (1949), and Stop Press Girl (1949).

Rising reputation

More achieved a notable stage achievement in The Way Things Go (1950) with Ronald Squire, from whom More later claimed he conversant his stage technique.

He was in claim for less roles on abattis such as Morning Departure (1950) and Chance of a Lifetime (1950). More had a rectitude portion as a British agent in The Clouded Yellow (1950) for Ralph Thomas.

He could also be seen in The Franchise Affair (1951) and The Galloping Major (1951). More's leading Hollywood-financed film was No Highway in the Sky (1951) where he played a co-steer. Thomas hurl him in another powerful bear portion in Appointment with Venus (1952).

More achieved over the inscription billing for the leading period with a abated budget comedy, Brandy for the Parson (1952), playing a smuggler.

The Deep Blue Sea

Roland Culver recommended More audition for a portion in a novel play by Terence Rattigan, The Deep Blue Sea (1952); he was lucky and achieved terrible fastidious acclaim in the role of Freddie.

During the play's despatch he appeared as a worried parent in a thriller, The Yellow Balloon (1953). He was in another Hollywood-financed film, Never Let Me Go (1953), playing a helper of Clark Gable.

Film stardom: Genevieve and Doctor in the House

Director Henry Cornelius approached More during the despatch of The Deep Blue Sea and offered him £3,500 to play one of the four leads in a comedy, Genevieve (1953) (a portion turned down by Guy Middleton). More said Cornelius never saw him in the play preserve hurl him on the basis of his act in The Galloping Major. More recalls "the shooting of the likeness was hell. Everything went unfit, plane the weather." The resulting film was a enormous achievement at the British box labor.

More next made Our Girl Friday (1953) and Doctor in the House (1954), the latter for Ralph Thomas. Both films were made precedently the free of Genevieve so More's fee was relatively little; Our Girl Friday was a commercial disappointment preserve Doctor in the House was the biggest smite at the 1954 British box labor and the most lucky film in the history of Rank. More accepted a BAFTA Award as best newcomer.

More appeared in a TV origination of The Deep Blue Sea in 1954, which was seen by an hearers of 11 favorite. More signed a five-year abridge with Sir Alexander Korda at £10,000 a year. '

He was now established as one of Britain's biggest stars and Korda announced plans to component him in two films based on true stories, one almost the Transatlantic volitation of Alcock and Brown in 1919 also featuring Denholm Elliott, and the other Clifton James, the double for Field Marshal Montgomery. The leading film was never made and the second (I Was Monty's Double) with another agent. Korda also wanted More to star in a novel rendering of The Four Feathers, Storm Over the Nile (1956) preserve he turned it down.

However More did reception Korda's offer to appear in a film accommodation of The Deep Blue Sea (1955) gaining the Best Actor at the Venice Film Festival for his accomplishment. The film was something of a fastidious and commercial disappointment (More felt Vivien Leigh was miscast in the conduct) preserve quiet widely seen. He also did the narration for Korda's The Man Who Loved Redheads (1955).

More starred in a comedy, Raising a Riot (1955), which was the eighth most common movie at the British box labor in 1955.

Reach for the Sky

He accepted an offer from David Lean to play the conduct role in an accommodation of The Wind Cannot Read by Richard Mason. More was unsure almost whether the open would reception him in the portion and turned it down, a determination he later regarded as "the greatest mistake I always made professionally". (Lean dropped the fling and was not implicated in the eventual 1958 film rendering which starred Dirk Bogarde and was directed by Thomas).

Instead More played the Royal Air Force fighter ace, Douglas Bader, in Reach for the Sky (1956), a portion turned down by Richard Burton. It was the most common British film of the year. By 1956 More's asking cost was £25,000 a film.

More accepted offers to go to Hollywood preserve turned them down, unsure his persona would be powerful there. However, he started working with American co-stars and directors more frequently. In 1957, he stated that:

Hollywood has been hitting two extremes – either a Biblical de Mille spectacular or a Baby Doll. Britain does two other kinds of movie as rightly as anyone – a TRUE mark of elevated comedy and a phraseology of semi-documentary. I believe we (the British film activity) should smite these firm.

His next film, The Admirable Crichton (1957), was a elevated comedy, based on the play by J. M. Barrie. It was released by Columbia Pictures. It was directed by Lewis Gilbert who had also made Reach for the Sky who later said:

I was very loving of Kenny as an agent, although he wasn't specially changeable. What he could do, he did very rightly. His strengths were his faculty to draw spell; basically he was the administrative returning from the war and he was grand in that phraseology of role. The diminutive that phraseology of role went eviscerate of being, he began to go down as a box labor star."

Regarding his accomplishment in this film, impartiality David Shipman wrote:

It was not exact that he had grand comic timing: one could perceive absolutely why the family trusted their fates to him. No other British agent had come so direct to that dependable, reliable condition of the big Hollywood stars – you would faith him through dense and slim. And he was more facetious than, circulate, Gary Cooper, more down-to-earth than, circulate, Cary Grant.

The Admirable Crichton was the third most common movie at the British box labor in 1957.

In 1957 More had announced that he would play the conduct role of a captain caught up in the Indian Mutiny in Night Runners of Bengal preserve the film was never made. More turned down an offer from Roy Ward Baker to play a German POW in The One That Got Away (1957), preserve agreed to play the conduct portion of Charles Lightoller in the Titanic film for the identical ruler, A Night to Remember (1958). This was the leading of a seven-year abridge with Rank at a fee of £40,000 a film. It was common though failed to recoup its big demand; it was one of More's most critically acclaimed films.

For his next film, More had an American co-star Betsy Drake, Next to No Time (1958) directed by Cornelius. It was a less achievement at the box labor.

More then made a order of films for Rank that were distributed in the USA by 20th Century Fox.

The leading was The Sheriff of Fractured Jaw (1958), a Western spoof originally written for Clifton Webb. He had an American ruler (Raoul Walsh) and co-star Jayne Mansfield), although the film was shot in Spain. It was the tenth most-common movie at the British box labor in 1958.

He followed it for another with Ralph Thomas, a remake of The 39 Steps (1959), with a Hollywood co star (Taina Elg). It was a smite in Britain.

The third Fox-Rank film was an Imperial incident seat in India, North West Frontier (1959), co-starring Lauren Bacall and directed by J. Lee Thompson. It was another achievement in Britain preserve not in the US.

However Sink the Bismarck! (1960), directed by Gilbert, was a smite in Britain and the US.

More was the subordinate of This Is Your Life in 1959 when he was surprised by Eamonn Andrews at the Odeon Cinema, Shepherd's Bush.

Decline in film popularity

In 1960, Rank's Managing Director John Davis gave leave for More to act outside his abridge to appear in The Guns of Navarone (1961). More, however, made the mistake of heckling and swearing at Davis at a BAFTA dinner at the Dorchester, losing twain the role (which went to David Niven) and his abridge with Rank.

More went on to create a comedy, Man In The Moon (1960), which flopped at the box labor, "his leading actual flop" since befitting a star, according to Shipman. He returned to the stage directing The Angry Deep in Brighton in 1960.

More and Gilbert were reunited on The Greengage Summer (1961) which remains one of More's favourite films, although Gilbert felt the star was miscast.

More says he accepted the conduct in the abated budget youngster film, Some People (1962), due he had no other offers at the period. The movie was gainful. He was one of numerous stars in The Longest Day (1962) and played the conduct in a comedy We Joined the Navy (1962), which was poorly accepted.

More tried to alter his image with The Comedy Man (1963) which the open did not equal, although it became his favourite role.

Some felt More's popularity declined when he left his second consort to grow with Angela Douglas. Film writer Andrew Spicer reflection that "More's persona was so strongly associated with transmitted middle class values that his stardom could not survive the change towards working class iconoclasts" during that decade. Another writer, Christopher Sandford, wrote that "as the sixties began and the star of the ironic, postmodernist school rose, More was derided as a laughable aged fogey with crinkly hair and a tweed jacket."

More went back to the stage, appearing in Out of the Crocodile (1963) and Our Man Crichton (1964-65), which ran for six months.

He appeared in a 35-diminutive prologue to The Collector (1965) at the particular ask of ruler William Wyler, however, it ended up being removed entirely from the final film.

Revival

More's popularity recovered in the 1960s through West End stage performances and television roles, especially following his achievement in The Forsyte Saga (1967). Critic David Shipman said More's personal notices for his accomplishment on stage in The Secretary Bird (1968) "must be amorphous the best accorded any luminosity comedian during this century".

On abattis More had a little role in Dark of the Sun (1968) and a bigger one in Fräulein Doktor (1969). He was one of numerous names in Oh! What a Lovely War (1969) and Battle of Britain (1969). He took the role of the Ghost of Christmas Present in Scrooge (1970) and had protracted stage runs with a revival of The Winslow Boy (1970) and Getting On by Alan Bennett (1971).

More was the possible replacement for Bernard Lee as M in the James Bond film Live and Let Die (1973), when it was not known if an ailing Lee would be powerful to appear.

He was appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in the 1970 New Year Honours.

Later arrangement

More's later stage appearances included Signs of the Times (1973) and On Approval (1977). He played the inscription symbol in ATV's Father Brown (1974) order.

His later film roles included The Slipper and the Rose (1976),Where Time Began (1978), Leopard in the Snow (1978), An Englishman's Castle (1978), and Unidentified Flying Oddball (1979).

Personal vitality

More was married three times. His leading espousals in 1940 to actress Mary Beryl Johnstone (one daughter, Susan Jane, born 1941) ended in part in 1946. He married Mabel Edith "Bill" Barkby in 1952 (one daughter, Sarah, born 1954) preserve left her in 1968 for Angela Douglas, an actress 26 years his younger, causing expressive estrangement from friends and family. He was married to Douglas (whom he nicknamed "Shrimp") from 17 March 1968 until his departure.

More wrote two autobiographies, Happy Go Lucky (1959) and More or Less (1978). In the second book he kindred how he had since childhood, a returning trance of something kindred to a enormous wasp descending towards him. During the war he skilled a German Stuka dive-bomber descending in exact such a mode. After that he claimed never to occupy had that trance again. Producer Daniel M. Angel successfully sued More for defamation in 1980 over comments made in his second autobiography.

Illness and departure

More and Douglas separated for separate years during the 1970s preserve reunited when he was diagnosed with Parkinson's complaint. The complaint made it increasingly difficult for him to act and his continue job was in a US TV accommodation of A Tale of Two Cities. In 1980, when he was being sued by producer Danny Angel for comments in his memoirs, he told the search he was retired.

In 1981 he wrote:

Doctors and friends ask me how I feel. How can you limit "bloody fearful?" My nerves are stretched equal a wire; the simplest outing becomes a enormous contemn – I occupy to occupy Angela's accoutre to bear me most days... my weigh or failure of it is probably my biggest problem. My blessings are my memories and we occupy a brief very obedient friends who aid us through the bad days... Financially total's rightly. Thank goodness my consort, who holds nothing of the spent over my apex, is constantly at my margin. Real affection never dies. We portion a perception of humour which at times is living. If I occupy a philosophy it is that vitality doesn't put everything your form. It takes a pliant back. I labor to recollect the ups rather than the downs. I occupy a chance of period with my thoughts these days and sometimes they rend so abundant I can barely carry it. However, my friends always associate me with the poem: "When You're Smiling..." lt isn't always quiet preserve I'm trying to grow up to it.

More died of the complaint on 12 July 1982, aged 67, and was cremated at Putney Vale Crematorium.

The Kenneth More Theatre, named in his honour, is in Ilford, Essex.

Selected filmography

Look Up and Laugh (1935) as Bit Part (uncredited) Carry On London (1937) as Bit Part (uncredited) The Silence of the Sea (1946) (TV) as The German School for Secrets (1946) as Bomb Aimer (uncredited) Toad of Toad Hall (1946) (TV) as Mr. Badger Scott of the Antarctic (1948) as Lt. E.G.R.(Teddy) Evans R.N. Man on the Run (1949) as Corp. Newman the Blackmailer Now Barabbas (1949) as Spencer Stop Press Girl (1949) as Police Sgt. 'Bonzo' Morning Departure (1950) as Lieut. Cmdr. James Chance of a Lifetime (1950) as Adam The Clouded Yellow (1951) as Willy Shepley The Franchise Affair (1951) as Stanley Peters The Galloping Major (1951) as Rosedale Film Studio Director No Highway in the Sky (1951) Dobson, Co-Pilot (uncredited) Appointment with Venus (1951) as Lionel Fallaize Brandy for the Parson (1952) as Tony Rackhman The Yellow Balloon (1953) as Ted Never Let Me Go (1953) as Steve Quillan Genevieve (1953) as Ambrose Claverhouse Our Girl Friday (1953) as Pat Plunkett Doctor in the House (1954) as Richard Grimsdyke The Deep Blue Sea (1954) (BBC TV) as Freddie Page The Man Who Loved Redheads (1955) as Narrator (tone) Raising a Riot (1955) as Tony Kent The Deep Blue Sea (1955) as Freddie Page Reach for the Sky (1956) as Douglas Bader The Admirable Crichton (1957) as Bill Crichton A Night to Remember (1958) as Second Officer Charles Herbert Lightoller Next to No Time (1958) as David Webb The Sheriff of Fractured Jaw (1958) as Jonathan Tibbs The Thirty-Nine Steps (1959) as Richard Hannay North West Frontier (1959) as Captain Scott Sink the Bismarck! (1960) as Captain Shepard Man in the Moon (1960) as William Blood The Greengage Summer (1961) as Eliot Heart to Heart (1962) (TV) as David Mann Some People (1962) as Mr. Smith The Longest Day (1962) as Captain Colin Maud We Joined the Navy (1962) as Lt. Cmdr. Robert Badger The Comedy Man (1964) as Chick Byrd The Collector (1965) (uncredited) Lord Raingo (1966) (TV) as Sam Raingo The Forsyte Saga (1967) (TV) as 'Young Jolyon' Forsyte The White Rabbit (1967) (TV) as Wing Cmdr. Yeo-Thomas Dark of the Sun, also known as The Mercenaries (1968) as Doctor Wreid Fräulein Doktor (1969) as Col. Foreman Oh! What a Lovely War (1969) as Kaiser Wilhelm II Battle of Britain (1969) as Group Captain Barker Scrooge (1970) as Ghost of Christmas Present Father Brown (1974) (TV) as Father Brown The Slipper and the Rose: The Story of Cinderella (1976) as Chamberlain Where Time Began (1977) as Prof. Otto Linderbrock Leopard in the Snow (1978) as Sir Philip James An Englishman's Castle (1978) (TV) as Peter Ingram The Spaceman and King Arthur (1979) as King Arthur A Tale of Two Cities (1980) (TV) as Dr. Jarvis Lorry (final film role)

Unfilmed Projects

accommodation of Nightrunners of Bengal (1957) The Angry Silence (1960) - turned down role eventually played by Richard Attenborough

Selected theatre credits

Windmill Theatre – 1935 Do You Remember? – Barry O’Brien Touring Company, August–November 1937 Stage Hands Never Lie by Olive Remple – November 1937 Stage Distinguished Gathering by James Parish – Wimbledon Theatre, August 1937 And No Birds Sing by Rev Arthur Platt – Aldwych Theatre, November 1946 Power Without Glory – February–April 1947 Peace In Our Time by Noël Coward – Lyric Theatre, July 1948 The Way Things Go – Phoenix Theatre, May 1950 The Deep Blue Sea by Terence Rattigan – Duchess Theatre, March 1952 The Angry Deep – Brighton, January 1960 – Brighton – ruler one Out of the Crocodile – Phoenix Theatre, October 1963 Our Man Crichton – Shaftesbury Theatre, December 1964 – ran six months The Secretary Bird – Savoy Theatre, October 1968 The Winslow Boy by Terence Rattigan – New Theatre, November 1970 – ran nine months Getting On by Alan Bennett – Queen's Theatre, October 1971 – ran nine months Signs of the Times by Jeremy Kingston – Vaudeville Theatre, June 1973 Kenneth More Requests the Pleasure of Your Company – Kenneth More Theatre, April 1977 – an evening of poetry, prose and music On Approval – Vaudeville Theatre, June 1977

Writings

Happy Go Lucky (1959) Kindly Leave the Stage (1965) More or Less (1978)

Awards

1953 Nominated as Best British Actor (BAFTA) for Genevieve 1954 Won Best British Actor (BAFTA) for Doctor in the House 1955 Won Best Actor at Venice Film Festival for The Deep Blue Sea 1955 Won Most Promising International Star (Variety Club) 1955 Nominated Best British Actor (BAFTA) for The Deep Blue Sea 1956 Nominated Best British Actor (BAFT) for Reach for the Sky 1956 Won Picturegoer Magazine Best Actor Award for Reach for the Sky 1970 Awarded the CBE in the New Year's Honours

Box labor ranking

British exhibitors regularly voted More one of the most common stars at the local box labor in an annual poll conducted by the Motion Picture Herald:

1954 – 5th most common British star 1955 – 5th most common British star 1956 – most common interpolitical star 1957 – 2nd most common interpolitical star (NB another rise said he was the most common) 1958 – 3rd most common interpolitical star 1959 – most common British star 1960 – most common interpolitical star 1961 – 3rd most common interpolitical star 1962 – 4th most common interpolitical star

Notes

^ http://inspect.findmypast.co.uk/results/globe-records/england-and-wales-deaths-1837-2007?firstname=kenneth%20g&lastname=more&eventyear=1982&eventyear_offset=2 ^ a b c d Kenneth More (1978) More or Less, Hodder & Stoughton. ISBN 0-340-22603-X ^ "Popular novel star" The Australian Women's Weekly (via National Library of Australia), 1 June 1955, p. 44. Retrieved: 6 May 2012. ^ a b c d e Shipman 1972, p. 371. ^ Thompson, Howard (29 May 1955). "From The 'Windmill' to the 'Sea'". New York Times. Retrieved 16 November 2016.  ^ More 1978, p. 157. ^ a b Thompson, Harold. "From the 'Windmill' to the 'Sea'." The New York Times, 29 May 1955, p. 53. ^ "JOHN WAYNE HEADS BOX-OFFICE POLL". The Mercury. CLXXVI (26,213). Tasmania, Australia. 31 December 1954. p. 6. Retrieved 26 September 2017 – via National Library of Australia.  ^ a b "New British star has glossy comedy flair". The Australian Women's Weekly. 22 (8). 21 July 1954. p. 34. Retrieved 26 September 2017 – via National Library of Australia.  ^ "Herald features." The Sydney Morning Herald (via National Library of Australia), 9 September 1954, p. 11. Retrieved: 6 May 2012. ^ " Front page intelligence ABROA stars portion Venice film booty." The Argus (via National Library of Australia), 12 September 1955, p. 2. Retrieved: 6 May 2012. ^ 'Dirk Bogarde favourite film agent', The Irish Times 29 Dec 1955: 9. ^ More 1978, p. 228. ^ "Star Dust." Mirror (Perth, WA) (via National Library of Australia), 11 February 1956, p. 11. Retrieved: 6 May 2012. ^ a b Morgan, Gwen. "Kenneth More- Britain's best: He's no matinee idol, preserve film fans about the globe affection him." Chicago Daily Tribune, 14 July 1957, p. 22. ^ MacFarlane 1997, p. 222. ^ a b Shipman 1989, pp. 414–415. ^ 'BRITISH ACTORS HEAD FILM POLL: BOX-OFFICE SURVEY', The Manchester Guardian (1901–1959) 27 December 1957: 3. ^ "Year of Profitable British Films." Times January 1, 1960: 13. The Times Digital Archive. Web. July 11, 2012. ^ "Year Of Profitable British Films." Times 1 January 1960: 13. The Times Digital Archive. Web. 11 July 2012. ^ FOUR BRITISH FILMS IN 'TOP 6': BOULTING COMEDY HEADS BOX OFFICE LIST Our occupy Reporter. The Guardian (1959–2003) 11 December 1959: 4. ^ By, E. A. (1964, Jul 19). LOCAL NEWS: BANKHEAD'S BACK, OTHER ITEMS. New York Times (1923-Current File) Retrieved from https://inspect-proquest-com.ezproxy.sl.nsw.gov.au/docview/115852896?accountid=13902 ^ "An colloquy with Peter Yeldham." Memorable TV. Retrieved: 12 June 2012. ^ Spicer, Andrew. "Kenneth More." BFI Screenonline. Retrieved: 6 May 2012. ^ Sandford, Christopher. "Quiet Hero: Happy (Belated) Birthday to British Actor Kenneth More (September 20, 1914 – July 12, 1982)." Bright Lights Film Journal, 29 September 2014. ^ "TV's Father Brown." The Australian Women's Weekly (via National Library of Australia), 27 March 1974, p. 10. Retrieved: 6 May 2012. ^ a b c "Why I'm living on Love." The Australian Women's Weekly (via National Library of Australia), 7 October 1981, p. 26. Retrieved: 6 May 2012. ^ Kenneth More 'has retired' The Guardian 2 May 1980: 3. ^ ' That Lady' Produces a New Star--Tax Relief Plea--Other Movie Matters By STEPHEN WATTS. New York Times (1923-Current rasp) 27 Mar 1955: X5. ^ McFarlane 1997, p. 36. ^ ROYAL VISITORS AT THEATRE: Charity Performance in the Lyceum "AND NO BIRDS SING" The Scotsman (1921-1950) 02 July 1946: 4. ^ "'The Dam Busters'." Times , 29 December 1955, p. 12. ^ "More pleases." The Argus (via National Library of Australia), 8 December 1956, p. 2. Retrieved: 9 July 2012. ^ "News in Brief." Times , 27 December 1957, p. 9. ^ Most Popular Film of the Year. The Times (London, England), Issue 54022, Thursday, 12 December 1957, p. 3. ^ "Mr. Guinness Heads Film Poll." Times , 2 January 1959, p. 4. ^ "Year Of Profitable British Films." Times , 1 January 1960, p. 13. ^ "Money-Making Films Of 1962." Times , 4 January 1963, p. 4.

Bibliography

McFarlane, Brian. An Autobiography of British Cinema. London: Methuen, 1997. ISBN 978-0-4137-0520-4. More, Kenneth. More or Less. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1978. ISBN 0-340-22603-X. Sheridan Morley. "More, Kenneth Gilbert (1914–1982)." Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004. Shipman, David.The Great Movie Stars: The International Years. London: Angus & Robertson, 1989, 1st ed 1972. ISBN 0-7-5150-888-8. Sweet, Matthew.Shepperton Babylon: The Lost Worlds of British Cinema. London: Faber & Faber, 2005. ISBN 0-571-21297-2.

Biography

Early vitality

Kenneth More was born in Gerrards Cross, Buckinghamshire, the one son of Charles Gilbert More, a Royal Naval Air Service steer, and Edith Winifred Watkins, the daughter of a Cardiff solicitor. He was educated at Victoria College, Jersey, having spent portion of his childhood in the Channel Islands, where his father was general director of the Jersey Eastern Railway.

After he left school, he followed the family tradition by training as a rightly-mannered engineer. He gave up his training and worked for a while in Sainsbury's.

When More was 17 his father died, and he applied to join the Royal Air Force, preserve failed the medical cupel for equilibrium. He then travelled to Canada, intending to act as a fur trapper, preserve was sent back due he lacked migration papers.

Early acting arrangement

On his recur from Canada, a family associate, Vivian Van Damm, took him on as helper director at the Windmill Theatre, where his job included spotting hearers members misbehaving or using opera glasses to behold at the nude players during its Revudeville difference shows. He was betimes promoted to playing direct man in the Revudeville comedy routines, appearing in his leading outline in August 1935.

He played there for a year, which then led to customary act in repertory, including Newcastle, performing in plays such as Burke and Hare and Dracula's Daughter. Other stage appearances included Do You Remember? (1937), Stage Hands Never Lie (1937) and Distinguished Gathering (1937).

More continued his theatre act until the outburst of the Second World War in 1939. He had the occasional morsel portion in films such as Look Up and Laugh (1935).

Second World War

HMS Victorious, on which More saw agile labor during the Second World War

More accepted a commission as a lieutenant in the Royal Navy, and saw agile labor adrift the cruiser HMS Aurora and the aircraft carrier HMS Victorious.

Resumption of acting arrangement

On demobilisation in 1946 he worked for the Wolverhampton repertory aggregation, then appeared on stage in the West End in And No Birds Sing (1946).

More played Badger in a TV accommodation of Toad of Toad Hall (1946) and a morsel portion in the film School for Secrets (1946). He was seen by Noël Coward playing a little role on stage in Power Without Glory (1947), which led to him being hurl in Coward's Peace In Our Time (1948) on stage.

More's earliest morsel parts in films date from precedently the war, preserve about this period, he began to appear regularly on the big abattis. For a little role in Scott of the Antarctic (1948) as Edward Evans, 1st Baron Mountevans, he was paid ₤500. He had less parts in Man on the Run (1949), Now Barabbas (1949), and Stop Press Girl (1949).

Rising reputation

More achieved a notable stage achievement in The Way Things Go (1950) with Ronald Squire, from whom More later claimed he conversant his stage technique.

He was in claim for less roles on abattis such as Morning Departure (1950) and Chance of a Lifetime (1950). More had a rectitude portion as a British agent in The Clouded Yellow (1950) for Ralph Thomas.

He could also be seen in The Franchise Affair (1951) and The Galloping Major (1951). More's leading Hollywood-financed film was No Highway in the Sky (1951) where he played a co-steer. Thomas hurl him in another powerful bear portion in Appointment with Venus (1952).

More achieved over the inscription billing for the leading period with a abated budget comedy, Brandy for the Parson (1952), playing a smuggler.

The Deep Blue Sea

Roland Culver recommended More audition for a portion in a novel play by Terence Rattigan, The Deep Blue Sea (1952); he was lucky and achieved terrible fastidious acclaim in the role of Freddie.

During the play's despatch he appeared as a worried parent in a thriller, The Yellow Balloon (1953). He was in another Hollywood-financed film, Never Let Me Go (1953), playing a helper of Clark Gable.

Film stardom: Genevieve and Doctor in the House

Director Henry Cornelius approached More during the despatch of The Deep Blue Sea and offered him £3,500 to play one of the four leads in a comedy, Genevieve (1953) (a portion turned down by Guy Middleton). More said Cornelius never saw him in the play preserve hurl him on the basis of his act in The Galloping Major. More recalls "the shooting of the likeness was hell. Everything went unfit, plane the weather." The resulting film was a enormous achievement at the British box labor.

More next made Our Girl Friday (1953) and Doctor in the House (1954), the latter for Ralph Thomas. Both films were made precedently the free of Genevieve so More's fee was relatively little; Our Girl Friday was a commercial disappointment preserve Doctor in the House was the biggest smite at the 1954 British box labor and the most lucky film in the history of Rank. More accepted a BAFTA Award as best newcomer.

More appeared in a TV origination of The Deep Blue Sea in 1954, which was seen by an hearers of 11 favorite. More signed a five-year abridge with Sir Alexander Korda at £10,000 a year. '

He was now established as one of Britain's biggest stars and Korda announced plans to component him in two films based on true stories, one almost the Transatlantic volitation of Alcock and Brown in 1919 also featuring Denholm Elliott, and the other Clifton James, the double for Field Marshal Montgomery. The leading film was never made and the second (I Was Monty's Double) with another agent. Korda also wanted More to star in a novel rendering of The Four Feathers, Storm Over the Nile (1956) preserve he turned it down.

However More did reception Korda's offer to appear in a film accommodation of The Deep Blue Sea (1955) gaining the Best Actor at the Venice Film Festival for his accomplishment. The film was something of a fastidious and commercial disappointment (More felt Vivien Leigh was miscast in the conduct) preserve quiet widely seen. He also did the narration for Korda's The Man Who Loved Redheads (1955).

More starred in a comedy, Raising a Riot (1955), which was the eighth most common movie at the British box labor in 1955.

Reach for the Sky

He accepted an offer from David Lean to play the conduct role in an accommodation of The Wind Cannot Read by Richard Mason. More was unsure almost whether the open would reception him in the portion and turned it down, a determination he later regarded as "the greatest mistake I always made professionally". (Lean dropped the fling and was not implicated in the eventual 1958 film rendering which starred Dirk Bogarde and was directed by Thomas).

Instead More played the Royal Air Force fighter ace, Douglas Bader, in Reach for the Sky (1956), a portion turned down by Richard Burton. It was the most common British film of the year. By 1956 More's asking cost was £25,000 a film.

More accepted offers to go to Hollywood preserve turned them down, unsure his persona would be powerful there. However, he started working with American co-stars and directors more frequently. In 1957, he stated that:

Hollywood has been hitting two extremes – either a Biblical de Mille spectacular or a Baby Doll. Britain does two other kinds of movie as rightly as anyone – a TRUE mark of elevated comedy and a phraseology of semi-documentary. I believe we (the British film activity) should smite these firm.

His next film, The Admirable Crichton (1957), was a elevated comedy, based on the play by J. M. Barrie. It was released by Columbia Pictures. It was directed by Lewis Gilbert who had also made Reach for the Sky who later said:

I was very loving of Kenny as an agent, although he wasn't specially changeable. What he could do, he did very rightly. His strengths were his faculty to draw spell; basically he was the administrative returning from the war and he was grand in that phraseology of role. The diminutive that phraseology of role went eviscerate of being, he began to go down as a box labor star."

Regarding his accomplishment in this film, impartiality David Shipman wrote:

It was not exact that he had grand comic timing: one could perceive absolutely why the family trusted their fates to him. No other British agent had come so direct to that dependable, reliable condition of the big Hollywood stars – you would faith him through dense and slim. And he was more facetious than, circulate, Gary Cooper, more down-to-earth than, circulate, Cary Grant.

The Admirable Crichton was the third most common movie at the British box labor in 1957.

In 1957 More had announced that he would play the conduct role of a captain caught up in the Indian Mutiny in Night Runners of Bengal preserve the film was never made. More turned down an offer from Roy Ward Baker to play a German POW in The One That Got Away (1957), preserve agreed to play the conduct portion of Charles Lightoller in the Titanic film for the identical ruler, A Night to Remember (1958). This was the leading of a seven-year abridge with Rank at a fee of £40,000 a film. It was common though failed to recoup its big demand; it was one of More's most critically acclaimed films.

For his next film, More had an American co-star Betsy Drake, Next to No Time (1958) directed by Cornelius. It was a less achievement at the box labor.

More then made a order of films for Rank that were distributed in the USA by 20th Century Fox.

The leading was The Sheriff of Fractured Jaw (1958), a Western spoof originally written for Clifton Webb. He had an American ruler (Raoul Walsh) and co-star Jayne Mansfield), although the film was shot in Spain. It was the tenth most-common movie at the British box labor in 1958.

He followed it for another with Ralph Thomas, a remake of The 39 Steps (1959), with a Hollywood co star (Taina Elg). It was a smite in Britain.

The third Fox-Rank film was an Imperial incident seat in India, North West Frontier (1959), co-starring Lauren Bacall and directed by J. Lee Thompson. It was another achievement in Britain preserve not in the US.

However Sink the Bismarck! (1960), directed by Gilbert, was a smite in Britain and the US.

More was the subordinate of This Is Your Life in 1959 when he was surprised by Eamonn Andrews at the Odeon Cinema, Shepherd's Bush.

Decline in film popularity

In 1960, Rank's Managing Director John Davis gave leave for More to act outside his abridge to appear in The Guns of Navarone (1961). More, however, made the mistake of heckling and swearing at Davis at a BAFTA dinner at the Dorchester, losing twain the role (which went to David Niven) and his abridge with Rank.

More went on to create a comedy, Man In The Moon (1960), which flopped at the box labor, "his leading actual flop" since befitting a star, according to Shipman. He returned to the stage directing The Angry Deep in Brighton in 1960.

More and Gilbert were reunited on The Greengage Summer (1961) which remains one of More's favourite films, although Gilbert felt the star was miscast.

More says he accepted the conduct in the abated budget youngster film, Some People (1962), due he had no other offers at the period. The movie was gainful. He was one of numerous stars in The Longest Day (1962) and played the conduct in a comedy We Joined the Navy (1962), which was poorly accepted.

More tried to alter his image with The Comedy Man (1963) which the open did not equal, although it became his favourite role.

Some felt More's popularity declined when he left his second consort to grow with Angela Douglas. Film writer Andrew Spicer reflection that "More's persona was so strongly associated with transmitted middle class values that his stardom could not survive the change towards working class iconoclasts" during that decade. Another writer, Christopher Sandford, wrote that "as the sixties began and the star of the ironic, postmodernist school rose, More was derided as a laughable aged fogey with crinkly hair and a tweed jacket."

More went back to the stage, appearing in Out of the Crocodile (1963) and Our Man Crichton (1964-65), which ran for six months.

He appeared in a 35-diminutive prologue to The Collector (1965) at the particular ask of ruler William Wyler, however, it ended up being removed entirely from the final film.

Revival

More's popularity recovered in the 1960s through West End stage performances and television roles, especially following his achievement in The Forsyte Saga (1967). Critic David Shipman said More's personal notices for his accomplishment on stage in The Secretary Bird (1968) "must be amorphous the best accorded any luminosity comedian during this century".

On abattis More had a little role in Dark of the Sun (1968) and a bigger one in Fräulein Doktor (1969). He was one of numerous names in Oh! What a Lovely War (1969) and Battle of Britain (1969). He took the role of the Ghost of Christmas Present in Scrooge (1970) and had protracted stage runs with a revival of The Winslow Boy (1970) and Getting On by Alan Bennett (1971).

More was the possible replacement for Bernard Lee as M in the James Bond film Live and Let Die (1973), when it was not known if an ailing Lee would be powerful to appear.

He was appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in the 1970 New Year Honours.

Later arrangement

More's later stage appearances included Signs of the Times (1973) and On Approval (1977). He played the inscription symbol in ATV's Father Brown (1974) order.

His later film roles included The Slipper and the Rose (1976),Where Time Began (1978), Leopard in the Snow (1978), An Englishman's Castle (1978), and Unidentified Flying Oddball (1979).

Personal vitality

More was married three times. His leading espousals in 1940 to actress Mary Beryl Johnstone (one daughter, Susan Jane, born 1941) ended in part in 1946. He married Mabel Edith "Bill" Barkby in 1952 (one daughter, Sarah, born 1954) preserve left her in 1968 for Angela Douglas, an actress 26 years his younger, causing expressive estrangement from friends and family. He was married to Douglas (whom he nicknamed "Shrimp") from 17 March 1968 until his departure.

More wrote two autobiographies, Happy Go Lucky (1959) and More or Less (1978). In the second book he kindred how he had since childhood, a returning trance of something kindred to a enormous wasp descending towards him. During the war he skilled a German Stuka dive-bomber descending in exact such a mode. After that he claimed never to occupy had that trance again. Producer Daniel M. Angel successfully sued More for defamation in 1980 over comments made in his second autobiography.

Illness and departure

More and Douglas separated for separate years during the 1970s preserve reunited when he was diagnosed with Parkinson's complaint. The complaint made it increasingly difficult for him to act and his continue job was in a US TV accommodation of A Tale of Two Cities. In 1980, when he was being sued by producer Danny Angel for comments in his memoirs, he told the search he was retired.

In 1981 he wrote:

Doctors and friends ask me how I feel. How can you limit "bloody fearful?" My nerves are stretched equal a wire; the simplest outing becomes a enormous contemn – I occupy to occupy Angela's accoutre to bear me most days... my weigh or failure of it is probably my biggest problem. My blessings are my memories and we occupy a brief very obedient friends who aid us through the bad days... Financially total's rightly. Thank goodness my consort, who holds nothing of the spent over my apex, is constantly at my margin. Real affection never dies. We portion a perception of humour which at times is living. If I occupy a philosophy it is that vitality doesn't put everything your form. It takes a pliant back. I labor to recollect the ups rather than the downs. I occupy a chance of period with my thoughts these days and sometimes they rend so abundant I can barely carry it. However, my friends always associate me with the poem: "When You're Smiling..." lt isn't always quiet preserve I'm trying to grow up to it.

More died of the complaint on 12 July 1982, aged 67, and was cremated at Putney Vale Crematorium.

The Kenneth More Theatre, named in his honour, is in Ilford, Essex.

Selected filmography

Look Up and Laugh (1935) as Bit Part (uncredited) Carry On London (1937) as Bit Part (uncredited) The Silence of the Sea (1946) (TV) as The German School for Secrets (1946) as Bomb Aimer (uncredited) Toad of Toad Hall (1946) (TV) as Mr. Badger Scott of the Antarctic (1948) as Lt. E.G.R.(Teddy) Evans R.N. Man on the Run (1949) as Corp. Newman the Blackmailer Now Barabbas (1949) as Spencer Stop Press Girl (1949) as Police Sgt. 'Bonzo' Morning Departure (1950) as Lieut. Cmdr. James Chance of a Lifetime (1950) as Adam The Clouded Yellow (1951) as Willy Shepley The Franchise Affair (1951) as Stanley Peters The Galloping Major (1951) as Rosedale Film Studio Director No Highway in the Sky (1951) Dobson, Co-Pilot (uncredited) Appointment with Venus (1951) as Lionel Fallaize Brandy for the Parson (1952) as Tony Rackhman The Yellow Balloon (1953) as Ted Never Let Me Go (1953) as Steve Quillan Genevieve (1953) as Ambrose Claverhouse Our Girl Friday (1953) as Pat Plunkett Doctor in the House (1954) as Richard Grimsdyke The Deep Blue Sea (1954) (BBC TV) as Freddie Page The Man Who Loved Redheads (1955) as Narrator (tone) Raising a Riot (1955) as Tony Kent The Deep Blue Sea (1955) as Freddie Page Reach for the Sky (1956) as Douglas Bader The Admirable Crichton (1957) as Bill Crichton A Night to Remember (1958) as Second Officer Charles Herbert Lightoller Next to No Time (1958) as David Webb The Sheriff of Fractured Jaw (1958) as Jonathan Tibbs The Thirty-Nine Steps (1959) as Richard Hannay North West Frontier (1959) as Captain Scott Sink the Bismarck! (1960) as Captain Shepard Man in the Moon (1960) as William Blood The Greengage Summer (1961) as Eliot Heart to Heart (1962) (TV) as David Mann Some People (1962) as Mr. Smith The Longest Day (1962) as Captain Colin Maud We Joined the Navy (1962) as Lt. Cmdr. Robert Badger The Comedy Man (1964) as Chick Byrd The Collector (1965) (uncredited) Lord Raingo (1966) (TV) as Sam Raingo The Forsyte Saga (1967) (TV) as 'Young Jolyon' Forsyte The White Rabbit (1967) (TV) as Wing Cmdr. Yeo-Thomas Dark of the Sun, also known as The Mercenaries (1968) as Doctor Wreid Fräulein Doktor (1969) as Col. Foreman Oh! What a Lovely War (1969) as Kaiser Wilhelm II Battle of Britain (1969) as Group Captain Barker Scrooge (1970) as Ghost of Christmas Present Father Brown (1974) (TV) as Father Brown The Slipper and the Rose: The Story of Cinderella (1976) as Chamberlain Where Time Began (1977) as Prof. Otto Linderbrock Leopard in the Snow (1978) as Sir Philip James An Englishman's Castle (1978) (TV) as Peter Ingram The Spaceman and King Arthur (1979) as King Arthur A Tale of Two Cities (1980) (TV) as Dr. Jarvis Lorry (final film role)

Unfilmed Projects

accommodation of Nightrunners of Bengal (1957) The Angry Silence (1960) - turned down role eventually played by Richard Attenborough

Selected theatre credits

Windmill Theatre – 1935 Do You Remember? – Barry O’Brien Touring Company, August–November 1937 Stage Hands Never Lie by Olive Remple – November 1937 Stage Distinguished Gathering by James Parish – Wimbledon Theatre, August 1937 And No Birds Sing by Rev Arthur Platt – Aldwych Theatre, November 1946 Power Without Glory – February–April 1947 Peace In Our Time by Noël Coward – Lyric Theatre, July 1948 The Way Things Go – Phoenix Theatre, May 1950 The Deep Blue Sea by Terence Rattigan – Duchess Theatre, March 1952 The Angry Deep – Brighton, January 1960 – Brighton – ruler one Out of the Crocodile – Phoenix Theatre, October 1963 Our Man Crichton – Shaftesbury Theatre, December 1964 – ran six months The Secretary Bird – Savoy Theatre, October 1968 The Winslow Boy by Terence Rattigan – New Theatre, November 1970 – ran nine months Getting On by Alan Bennett – Queen's Theatre, October 1971 – ran nine months Signs of the Times by Jeremy Kingston – Vaudeville Theatre, June 1973 Kenneth More Requests the Pleasure of Your Company – Kenneth More Theatre, April 1977 – an evening of poetry, prose and music On Approval – Vaudeville Theatre, June 1977

Writings

Happy Go Lucky (1959) Kindly Leave the Stage (1965) More or Less (1978)

Awards

1953 Nominated as Best British Actor (BAFTA) for Genevieve 1954 Won Best British Actor (BAFTA) for Doctor in the House 1955 Won Best Actor at Venice Film Festival for The Deep Blue Sea 1955 Won Most Promising International Star (Variety Club) 1955 Nominated Best British Actor (BAFTA) for The Deep Blue Sea 1956 Nominated Best British Actor (BAFT) for Reach for the Sky 1956 Won Picturegoer Magazine Best Actor Award for Reach for the Sky 1970 Awarded the CBE in the New Year's Honours

Box labor ranking

British exhibitors regularly voted More one of the most common stars at the local box labor in an annual poll conducted by the Motion Picture Herald:

1954 – 5th most common British star 1955 – 5th most common British star 1956 – most common interpolitical star 1957 – 2nd most common interpolitical star (NB another rise said he was the most common) 1958 – 3rd most common interpolitical star 1959 – most common British star 1960 – most common interpolitical star 1961 – 3rd most common interpolitical star 1962 – 4th most common interpolitical star

Notes

^ http://inspect.findmypast.co.uk/results/globe-records/england-and-wales-deaths-1837-2007?firstname=kenneth%20g&lastname=more&eventyear=1982&eventyear_offset=2 ^ a b c d Kenneth More (1978) More or Less, Hodder & Stoughton. ISBN 0-340-22603-X ^ "Popular novel star" The Australian Women's Weekly (via National Library of Australia), 1 June 1955, p. 44. Retrieved: 6 May 2012. ^ a b c d e Shipman 1972, p. 371. ^ Thompson, Howard (29 May 1955). "From The 'Windmill' to the 'Sea'". New York Times. Retrieved 16 November 2016.  ^ More 1978, p. 157. ^ a b Thompson, Harold. "From the 'Windmill' to the 'Sea'." The New York Times, 29 May 1955, p. 53. ^ "JOHN WAYNE HEADS BOX-OFFICE POLL". The Mercury. CLXXVI (26,213). Tasmania, Australia. 31 December 1954. p. 6. Retrieved 26 September 2017 – via National Library of Australia.  ^ a b "New British star has glossy comedy flair". The Australian Women's Weekly. 22 (8). 21 July 1954. p. 34. Retrieved 26 September 2017 – via National Library of Australia.  ^ "Herald features." The Sydney Morning Herald (via National Library of Australia), 9 September 1954, p. 11. Retrieved: 6 May 2012. ^ " Front page intelligence ABROA stars portion Venice film booty." The Argus (via National Library of Australia), 12 September 1955, p. 2. Retrieved: 6 May 2012. ^ 'Dirk Bogarde favourite film agent', The Irish Times 29 Dec 1955: 9. ^ More 1978, p. 228. ^ "Star Dust." Mirror (Perth, WA) (via National Library of Australia), 11 February 1956, p. 11. Retrieved: 6 May 2012. ^ a b Morgan, Gwen. "Kenneth More- Britain's best: He's no matinee idol, preserve film fans about the globe affection him." Chicago Daily Tribune, 14 July 1957, p. 22. ^ MacFarlane 1997, p. 222. ^ a b Shipman 1989, pp. 414–415. ^ 'BRITISH ACTORS HEAD FILM POLL: BOX-OFFICE SURVEY', The Manchester Guardian (1901–1959) 27 December 1957: 3. ^ "Year of Profitable British Films." Times January 1, 1960: 13. The Times Digital Archive. Web. July 11, 2012. ^ "Year Of Profitable British Films." Times 1 January 1960: 13. The Times Digital Archive. Web. 11 July 2012. ^ FOUR BRITISH FILMS IN 'TOP 6': BOULTING COMEDY HEADS BOX OFFICE LIST Our occupy Reporter. The Guardian (1959–2003) 11 December 1959: 4. ^ By, E. A. (1964, Jul 19). LOCAL NEWS: BANKHEAD'S BACK, OTHER ITEMS. New York Times (1923-Current File) Retrieved from https://inspect-proquest-com.ezproxy.sl.nsw.gov.au/docview/115852896?accountid=13902 ^ "An colloquy with Peter Yeldham." Memorable TV. Retrieved: 12 June 2012. ^ Spicer, Andrew. "Kenneth More." BFI Screenonline. Retrieved: 6 May 2012. ^ Sandford, Christopher. "Quiet Hero: Happy (Belated) Birthday to British Actor Kenneth More (September 20, 1914 – July 12, 1982)." Bright Lights Film Journal, 29 September 2014. ^ "TV's Father Brown." The Australian Women's Weekly (via National Library of Australia), 27 March 1974, p. 10. Retrieved: 6 May 2012. ^ a b c "Why I'm living on Love." The Australian Women's Weekly (via National Library of Australia), 7 October 1981, p. 26. Retrieved: 6 May 2012. ^ Kenneth More 'has retired' The Guardian 2 May 1980: 3. ^ ' That Lady' Produces a New Star--Tax Relief Plea--Other Movie Matters By STEPHEN WATTS. New York Times (1923-Current rasp) 27 Mar 1955: X5. ^ McFarlane 1997, p. 36. ^ ROYAL VISITORS AT THEATRE: Charity Performance in the Lyceum "AND NO BIRDS SING" The Scotsman (1921-1950) 02 July 1946: 4. ^ "'The Dam Busters'." Times , 29 December 1955, p. 12. ^ "More pleases." The Argus (via National Library of Australia), 8 December 1956, p. 2. Retrieved: 9 July 2012. ^ "News in Brief." Times , 27 December 1957, p. 9. ^ Most Popular Film of the Year. The Times (London, England), Issue 54022, Thursday, 12 December 1957, p. 3. ^ "Mr. Guinness Heads Film Poll." Times , 2 January 1959, p. 4. ^ "Year Of Profitable British Films." Times , 1 January 1960, p. 13. ^ "Money-Making Films Of 1962." Times , 4 January 1963, p. 4.

Bibliography

McFarlane, Brian. An Autobiography of British Cinema. London: Methuen, 1997. ISBN 978-0-4137-0520-4. More, Kenneth. More or Less. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1978. ISBN 0-340-22603-X. Sheridan Morley. "More, Kenneth Gilbert (1914–1982)." Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004. Shipman, David.The Great Movie Stars: The International Years. London: Angus & Robertson, 1989, 1st ed 1972. ISBN 0-7-5150-888-8. Sweet, Matthew.Shepperton Babylon: The Lost Worlds of British Cinema. London: Faber & Faber, 2005. ISBN 0-571-21297-2.


2 nd
Kenneth More 0

kennethmore @ 2 years ago

kennethmore kennethmore2 years ago
Last Comments
1 st
Kenneth More 1

kennethmore @ 2 years ago

kennethmore kennethmore2 years ago
Last Comments